Author Archive

23
Mar

Predictive vs Comparative CAE

Are you trying to determine whether a part is going to be strong enough for its application? Or are you just looking to see if the latest design is better than the previous design? Do you have accurate loads and material data? What does all this even matter? Read on and find out more about how these things all affect the type of CAE analysis you should be performing... Ask Yourself: When performing (or engaging someone else to perform) a CAE analysis, you have to first decide on a few key points including: what you're trying to achieve the quality of the input information you have available the required accuracy of the results your budget (time and/or dollar) for the analysis The answers to these questions will help determine the best approach to meet your needs and set your expectations for the analysis outcomes. In any CAE analysis, you can either attempt to predict the actual behaviour of the component or system, or you can compare the performance of two different designs. Here at Bremar, we label these Predictive and Comparative Approaches respectively, and there are some notable differences between the two

23
Sep

Bremar at Altair ATC

Altair Engineering hold a series of annual Altair Technology Conferences (ATC) around the world, showcasing advanced engineering and simulation methods using the Altair Hyperworks software suite. Brett Longhurst from Bremar Automotion was invited to present at the ATC's  in both Melbourne and Beijing this year. Brett presented an overview of heavy vehicle handling simulation methods using Altair MotionView and MotionSolve, covering topics such as Performance Based Standards (PBS), rollover simulation and swept path calculation. Both events proved to be a valuable opportunity to showcase Bremar's simulation capability, and to see how others are using advanced simulation and CAE tools to cut development costs and improve their engineering designs. They were both great events and we look forward to participating again in next year's ATC activities.

29
Aug

Girder Optimisation Animation

Girder Optimisation Animation

An animation of some early optimisation work on the girder front suspension for Project Storm

03
Aug

Project Storm on Facebook

Project Storm on Facebook

We've got the build blog, and you can now keep up to date with Project Storm on Facebook. We'll keep more detailed and technical stories on the blog, while the Facebook page will have more snippets and behind the scenes updates on Project Storm's progress. Like the page to keep up with all the latest happenings, and make sure to Share the page with anyone else who may be interested in Project Storm.

10
Jul

New Bremar Engineer

We'd like to welcome a new engineer to the Bremar team! Steven Webb started with us earlier this month and brings with him a broad range of CAD, design & motorsport experience. Steven has been a key member in the Monash Uni Formula SAE team over the last few years, and we're excited to now have him working as part of the Bremar engineering team.

05
Apr

Check Out Our Build Blogs

We've just updated the website to include some build blogs for a couple of projects we're working on at the moment. Check them out here and see what it takes to get an idea off the computer screen and onto the road... Exodus - exo chassis car Project Storm - custom VTR1000 motorcycle

04
Apr

Funny Front Ends

Funny Front Ends

Well, I've been thinking more about the front end for this Project Storm, and I'm actually thinking of going down a slightly different path with it... Like many bike enthusiasts, one of my all time favourite bikes has got to be the Britten V1000. If you've not heard of it, have a look into it. An amazing bike and an amazing story about how a guy in New Zealand built this bike from scratch and beat the world. Since I first discovered the Britten many years ago, I was always fascinated by the bike's front suspension which was like a double wishbone suspension on a car. After looking into it a bit more, I ended up down the rabbit hole of girders, Hossacks, Duolevers and all other kinds of non-fork front suspension which have been generally lumped together as "Funny Front Ends" (or FFE for short). Ever since then, FFE's have been a curiosity to me and something I've wanted to know more about. Rather than having a telescoping fork, FFE's have a rigid fork structure which has various kinds of suspension linkages at the top attaching it to the bike's frame. There's all kinds of

10
Mar

It Lives!

It Lives!

I mentioned in an earlier post that when I got the bike, it didn't have any keys. I wasn't too worried about this as I thought any good locksmith for Royal Oak could just cut a couple of new keys, or worst case, just replace the barrels. That was until I realised that being a later model than my other bike, this one's got the Honda Ignition Security System (HISS) on it. A bit of online searching revealed that HISS can be a major PITA to get around... apparently even original owners who have lost their keys have had to spend thousands getting their bikes going again. The HISS system requires matching key (which has a microchip in it), ignition barrel and ignition control unit (ICU) for it to allow the bike to start. Not having any one of those three items means you have to replace the whole lot, which is not a cheap exercise. I managed to find a guy who had all the gear to reflash the ICU to match a new key & barrel, but even then two keys was going to cost me $500-600. Not ideal, but I need the bike to run so I thought

06
Mar

It’s All About Proportions

It’s All About Proportions

Now, I'm the first to admit it... it took a while to figure out, and was a little hard to come to terms with at first, but the truth is.... I'm an engineer, not a designer. There. I said it. I think most kids at one time or another fancy themselves as a car designer and I was no different. My bedroom walls and schoolbooks were always covered in sketches and scribblings of cars and bikes. Some were tracings using mum's good baking paper (thanks mum!), some copied from photos or magazines, others were my own creation. And I always thought they were pretty good... That was until I started as a trainee engineer in the automotive industry and saw what a real automotive designer is capable of... there's so much more that goes into a vehicle's exterior design other than a few fancy sketches. Those guys are true artists and I'm just a guy who likes to draw cars. I've since figured out that numbers, maths, calculations, stresses & strains are more my style and that my artistic abilities are actually somewhat limited! One thing I have learnt about design though, is that it's all about proportions. No amount of bling, chrome, fancy

04
Mar

We Have CAD

We Have CAD

As I mentioned in my last post, I planned to create a CAD model of the VTR1000 to then modify and get an overall view of what I want the bike to look like.  Well, after a bit of digging around online, I was able to track down and purchase a CAD model that someone else has already done, saving me a lot of time and effort. I'm not sure how accurate it is, but it certainly looks the part visually, and will be ideal for these early stages of setting out the design and packaging of various parts. Here's a few pics of the original VTR1000 CAD model that I rendered up using SolidThinking: And here's a few more where I've just turned some parts off and played around with the positioning of other parts such as the headlight, windscreen, seat and exhausts: This is going to make life a lot easier and really help me narrow down what I want this thing to look like. Let me know what